Random Thoughts: Change, Primary Sources & Other Stuff

Teaching with Primary Sources: Classroom Ready Materials

Posted on: September 25, 2013

I can’t help it!  When I see historic artifacts online I think about how media specialists can use these resources in the media center when they instruct students or when they collaborate with teachers. When I saw the movie 42 I instantly thought of Baseball Across a Divided Society, a primary source set available as one of the classroom materials on the Library of Congress Teachers Page.  When I saw The Butler I thought about how I could have used The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom when I worked with social studies teachers. Or, I could have used From Slavery to Civil Rights; A Timeline of African-American History, a Teachers Page presentation.

Primary source sets are groups of photos, documents and other primary sources compiled to support commonly taught topics. Presentations are designed for guided student use; lesson plans are in-depth, on a vast range of topics, and aligned with common core standards. The bottom line: Someone else has found the resources and designed materials for you! They are ready to use now!

Read more about these helpful, time-saving resources in the current  NEW MEDIA CENTER: column “Classroom-Ready Materials on the Library of Congress Teachers Page,” in the September/October Internet@Schools.
Full Text, Internet @Schools Web Site.    Or, select the  Power of Primary Sources link  above for this and other articles about finding and using primary sources.
Media specialists will want to become familiar with these  wonderful material as you help  teachers and students make powerful curricular connections with primary sources.

Online class for educators: Teaching Digital Media Literacy in the Content Areas: Using Primary Sources

Baseball

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2 Responses to "Teaching with Primary Sources: Classroom Ready Materials"

[…] Primary source sets are groups of photos, documents and other primary sources compiled to support commonly taught topics. Presentations are designed for guided student use; lesson plans are in-depth, on a vast range of …  […]

[…] I can't help it! When I see historic artifacts online I think about how media specialists can use these resources in the media center when they instruct students or when they collaborate with teachers.  […]

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