Random Thoughts: Change, Primary Sources & Other Stuff

Posts Tagged ‘Civil War

Where can I find information about. . .?      civilwarmonumnet

The First Minnesota Volunteers
Company K
Photos of Charley Goddard’s mother and brother
Charley Goddard Biography
Battle of Gettysburg primary sources
Charley Goddard letters
Charley Goddard 15 years old
Charles Goddard
Old Abe

It looks like middle level students are reading Gary Paulsen’s young adult novel Soldiers Heart; at least that’s what the search term log suggests. This post suggests resources for students and teachers who are looking for the background and historical information behind the novel. Some of these were cited in an earlier post.

Catherine Goddard SmithThe real-life Charles Goddard  lived in Winona, Minnesota, served with Company K of the 1st  Minnesota Volunteer Regiment, and fought at Gettysburg.   Regiment casualties were high and many Winona County soldiers lost their lives.  Charles survived the battle and returned to Winona.  He died in 1867 at age 24.  The Goddard family name appears often in accounts of early Winona.
Resources

What about  Old Abe?  Was he in Company K? This gallant eagle was from our neighboring State of Wisconsin, but he also served in the Battle of Gettysburg!

Photos: Civil War Memorial, Winona Veterans Memorial Park; Catherine Goddard Smith

Previous post:  Charlie Goddard and Company K

Old Abe the War Eagle

What primary sources do you see in the display?

A while ago I joined students on a field trip to the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, Minnesota. We enjoyed a presentation featuring live eagles and learned about conversation and the eagle as our national symbol. Old Abe, the Wisconsin War Eagle is the subject of a special display. The field trip was ideal for a short follow-up activity to learn more about the mascot of the Wisconsin 8th regiment. Abe perched atop a staff during battles.  After the war Abe lived in the Capitol Basement; he later died from lingering injuries he suffered in a Capitol fire. Abe’s taxidermied body burned in another fire.  Students learned how Abe was honored in
Old Abe the battle eagle song & chorus poetry  and identified states a Historic Eagle Map of the United States.
Sheet Music, Old Abe the Battle Eagle
It was a great teaching moment in the media center!

Civil War era music is easy to find in American Memory Collections. Start with:
Civil War Band Music

Nineteenth Century Song Sheets

Historic American Sheet Music, 1850 – 1920

African-American Sheet Music, 1850-1920
The Alfred Whital Stern Collection of Lincolniana

Learn how to use and other Civil War era resources to develop engaging, critical thinking activities for students

Teaching Digital Media Literacy in the Content Areas: Using Primary Sources 

Looking for more information about Charley Goddard and Company K in the Civil War?
Charley, the young soldier in Gary Paulsen’s young adult novel A Soldier’s Heart  is mentioned in an August post,  Music and letters connect us with the Civil War.   Here are more resources about Charley and the Minnesota 1st regiment.

Sergeant Buckman’s Diary; First Minnesota at the Battle of Gettysburg is not specifically about Charley Goddard, but is about the Minnesota regiment Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 30, 2013. 

Winona County Historical Society
Company K, A Civil War Journal, Minnesota 1st Volunteer Regiment
Letters, diaries, newspapers, regiment roster, and more primary sources.

Christmas, 1852. Winona’s Early History (Winona County History Center)

Winona’s Early History.  The Pioneer Settlers section has information about Catherine Goddard Smith, Charley’s mother, and his friend Charles Ely.

Library of Congress American Memory Collections
Civil War Photos, Brady Collection.  Subject: Minnesota troops
Pioneering the Upper Midwest:
   Keyword:   Christmas in Early Winona.
Read about an 1852  Christmas dinner at a Winona home and a unique menu item!


Teaching with Primary Sources
, an online class for teachers of all content areas begins January 2012.  Students comments.

Register Online: http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/register.cfm

The sesquicentennial of the Civil War and today’s news media stories about Fort Sumter have left my head spinning.

There are an abundance of primary source  Civil War documents, photographs, maps, political  cartoons, and ephemera readily available to us in digital format. But how do we find it?   Digitalization makes these resources come alive and accessible to everyone.  Digital  Civil War resources range from photographs and diaries on county historical society web sites to countless museums and  libraries including the Library of Congress.   Primary sources  aren’t that hard to find, but how do we use them to enhance student learning through inquiry and critical thinking.

Even teachers experienced with using primary sources find the vastness of digital collection overwhelming.  One teacher is concerned about the amount of time a research project using primary sources will take.    But, using primary sources does not have to take a tremendous amount of time; finding the right resources doesn’t take long if you know where to look.  Start  small.  Focus  on a narrow topic or even on a single resource.  

The teacher who descried herself as “overwhelmed” introduced me to The Last Full Measure: Civil War Photographs from the Liljenquist Family Collection, a collection recently added to the  Library of Congress.     This unique collection was donated to the Library by the  Lillenquest family of Virginia.  Two  teens, previously the teacher’s  students,  became interested in the photos when they began purchasing them at auctions.  What a story!

The collection is available for viewing at the Library of Congress and online.

Learn how you can starting small and  create engaging, thoughtful student activities.
Online course: Teaching with Primary Sources,
Comments from Past Students
Register Online: http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/register.cfm


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